Ana Simo with C. Russell Price at the American Writers Museum
Jun
5
6:00 PM18:00

Ana Simo with C. Russell Price at the American Writers Museum

In celebration of LGBT Pride Month, Ana Simo will appear at Chicago's American Writers Museum on Tuesday, June 5 at 7PM to discuss her book Heartland, with C. Russell Price, author of Tonight, We Fuck the Trailer Park Out of Each Other.

A word-drunk romp through an alternate, pre-apocalyptic United States, Ana Simo's fiction debut is the uproarious story of a thwarted writer’s elaborate revenge on the woman who stole her lover. Blending elements of telenovela, pulp noir, and dystopian satire, Heartland is above all a hallucinatory indictment of racism, American style.

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A New Yorker most of her life, Ana Simo came of age in a Cuba where a revolution’s sense of endless freedom was almost immediately replaced by iron-fisted censorship and rabidly homophobic witch-hunts that jailed or institutionalized LGBT people, forcing her and others to flee.

In France, she studied with Roland Barthes, participated in early women’s and gay/lesbian rights groups, also continued a life-long dialogue with European (& American) writers. Her literary family includes the profane, anti-clerical satirist Rabelais (Gargantua and Pantagruel), Robert Walser (Jakob von Gunten), Kathy Acker (Don Quixote) and Marie NDiaye (The Woman Changed Into A Log).

Immigrating finally to New York in the 1970s, Simo put down roots in the artistically and politically transgressive East Village where she co-founded the city’s first openly lesbian theater, Medusa’s Revenge, and felt free to attack her persistent preoccupations of immigration and assimilation, history, guilt, race, sex, and the impossibility of language, themes that appear in Heartland and throughout her work from the early play Pickaxe about Trotsky’s murder to The Opium Wars, a collaboration with composer Zeena Parkins.

Simo is also the co-founder of the direct action group the Lesbian Avengers, the national cable program Dyke TV, and The Gully online magazine, offering queer views on everything.

C. Russell Price, a 2015 Lambda Fellow in Poetry, is an Appalachian genderqueer poet living in Chicago. They hold a BA from the University of Virginia and an MFA from Northwestern University. Price’s chapbook Tonight, We Fuck The Trailer Park Out Of Each Other will be published by Sibling Rivalry Press in Summer 2016. Price currently works with The Offing and teaches creative writing at Northwestern.

Through innovative and dynamic state-of-the-art exhibitions, as well as compelling programming, the American Writers Museum educates, enriches, provokes, and inspires visitors of all ages.

Where: The American Writers Museum, 180 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60601
When: Tuesday, June 5, 6PM
 

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May
13
3:00 PM15:00

Arshia Sattar at The Elliott Bay Book Company

On Sunday, May 13, renowned scholar and author Arshia Sattar will appear at The Elliott Bay Book Company to discuss her illustrated retelling of the Ramayana. An unforgettable tale of love, adventure, flying monkeys and god acting in the world of humans, Ramayana has been treasured by readers around the world for thousands of years. Now in an authoritative, gripping retelling, readers have a new chance to explore this classic’s riches.

Arshia Sattar has a PhD in classical Indian literatures from the University of Chicago. Her translations from Sanskrit, The Ramayana of Valmiki and Tales from the Kathasaritsagara, have been published as Penguin Classics. She has also written books for children, including The Adventures of Hanuman.

The Elliott Bay Book Company is an independently owned bookstore founded by Walter Carr in 1973, at 109 Main Street. Over the next three and half decades, the bookstore shifted and expanded within the Globe Building adding event space for author readings as well as Seattle’s first bookstore café.

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May
6
1:00 PM13:00

Arshia Sattar at the Restless Readers Weekend

Join us at The Eric Carle Museum on Sunday, May 6 as renowned Ramayana scholar and children's book author Arshia Sattar discusses the Ramayana and her illustrated adaptation of the ancient Hindu sacred text. An unforgettable tale of love, adventure, flying monkeys, and god acting in the world of humans, Ramayana has been treasured by readers around the world for thousands of years. Now in an authoritative, gripping retelling, readers have a new chance to explore this classic’s riches.

The talk will be followed by storytime and a book signing with Arshia, as part of our inaugural Restless Readers Weekend

Arshia Sattar has a PhD in classical Indian literatures from the University of Chicago. Her translations from Sanskrit, The Ramayana of Valmiki and Tales from the Kathasaritsagara, have been published as Penguin Classics. She has also written books for children, including The Adventures of Hanuman.

Launched by Restless Books in 2018, the Restless Readers Weekend provides passionate readers with an opportunity to return to the atmosphere of college in an idyllic New England town and explore literature in depth with professors and authors, interact with other devoted readers, create community, and ask essential questions literature prompts us to explore: Who are we? Who are our neighbors? In what way do we all shape the culture we live in?

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May
3
4:30 PM16:30

Arshia Sattar Reading Ramayana in Hindu India

  • Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Frost Library (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
 

On Thursday, May 3, renowned scholar and author Arshia Sattar will appear at Amherst College Frost Library to discuss her illustrated retelling of the Ramayana. An unforgettable tale of love, adventure, flying monkeys and god acting in the world of humans, Ramayana has been treasured by readers around the world for thousands of years. Now in an authoritative, gripping retelling, readers have a new chance to explore this classic’s riches.

Arshia Sattar has a PhD in classical Indian literatures from the University of Chicago. Her translations from Sanskrit, The Ramayana of Valmiki and Tales from the Kathasaritsagara, have been published as Penguin Classics. She has also written books for children, including The Adventures of Hanuman.

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May
1
7:00 PM19:00

Shahriar Mandanipour and Claire Messud at Newtonville Books

Join us on Tuesday, May 1, to celebrate Iranian novelist Shahriar Mandanipour's first novel in nine years, Moon Brow, at Newtonville Books, where he will appear in conversation with acclaimed author Claire Messud. 

In a piece for New York Review of Books about Mandanipour's previous novel, Censoring an Iranian Love Story, Messud wrote: 

“While his fiction remained unpublished in Iran for much of the 1990s on account of censorship, he is one of that country’s most celebrated and accomplished contemporary novelists. For another, born in 1957 (and thus a generation older than most of the others), he was an adult when the Islamic Republic was created. He remained in Iran for a quarter century thereafter, and has, consequently, a very different perspective from those who left as children, in the early 1980s…. Playfully and yet with utter seriousness, Mandanipour exposes his constraints, and also the devices by which he might hope to convey his matter indirectly: traditional Iranian poetry; cinema. In so doing, Mandanipour expresses the complexity of his culture—not just of the society of the Islamic Republic, but of the underlying Persian traditions that continue to influence it—through the warp and weft of the text itself. This novel doesn’t offer a conventionally realistic narrative, but to read it—and to appreciate that simply on account of its publication, Mandanipour is henceforth unable to return to Iran—is to understand, by inhabiting rather than by being told, what life there now, and the making of art, might actually be like.”

—Claire Messud, New York Review of Books

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About the Authors

Shahriar Mandanipour is one of Iran’s most accomplished writers, the author of nine volumes of fiction, one nonfiction book, and more than 100 critical essays. Born in 1957 in Shiraz, Iran, he studied political science at Tehran University and bore witness to the 1979 revolution. After the onset of the Iran-Iraq War in 1980, he joined the military and volunteered for duty at the front, where he served for more than eighteen months. His first collection of stories was published in 1989; his works were banned between 1992 and 1997. In 2006, he moved to the United States and has held fellowships at Brown, Harvard, and Boston College. Mandanipour’s first novel to appear in English, Censoring an Iranian Love Story (Knopf,  2009), has been widely acclaimed. He currently teaches creative writing at Tufts University.

Claire Messud is a recipient of Guggenheim and Radcliffe Fellowships and the Strauss Living Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Author of five previous works of fiction including her most recent novel, The Woman Upstairs, she lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with her family.

Where: 10 Langley Road Newton Centre, Newton, MA 02459 

When: Tuesday, May 1, 7PM

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Shahriar Mandanipour at Brookline Booksmith's Transnational Literature Series
Apr
30
7:00 PM19:00

Shahriar Mandanipour at Brookline Booksmith's Transnational Literature Series

On Monday, April 30th at 7pm, Iranian novelist Shahriar Mandanipour will discuss his magisterial novel of love and war, Moon Brow, with his intrepid translator Sara Khalili and Restless Books publisher Ilan Stavans as part of Brookline Booksmith's Transnational Literature Series, which focuses on books concerning migration, exile and displacement. 

Shahriar Mandanipour is one of Iran’s most accomplished writers, the author of nine volumes of fiction, one nonfiction book, and more than 100 critical essays. Born in 1957 in Shiraz, Iran, he studied political science at Tehran University and bore witness to the 1979 revolution. After the onset of the Iran-Iraq war in 1980, he joined the military and volunteered for duty at the front, where he served for more than eighteen months. His first collection of stories was published in 1989; his works were banned between 1992 and 1997. In 2006, he moved to the United States and has held fellowships at Brown, Harvard, and Boston College. Mandanipour’s first novel to appear in English, Censoring an Iranian Love Story (Knopf,  2009), has been widely acclaimed. He currently teaches creative writing at Tufts University.

Sara Khalili is an editor and translator of contemporary Iranian literature. Her translations include Censoring an Iranian Love Story by Shahriar Mandanipour, The Pomegranate Lady and Her Sons by Goli Taraghi, The Book of Fate by Parinoush Saniee, and Rituals of Restlessness by Yaghoub Yadali. She has also translated several volumes of poetry by Forough Farrokhzad, Simin Behbahani, Siavash Kasraii, and Fereydoon Moshiri. Her short story translations have appeared in The Kenyon ReviewThe Virginia Quarterly ReviewEPOCHGRANTA, Words Without Borders, The Literary Review, PEN America, Witness, and Consequence.

Ilan Stavans is the Publisher of Restless Books and the Lewis-Sebring Professor of Humanities, Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College. His books include On Borrowed WordsSpanglishDictionary DaysThe Disappearance, and A Critic’s Journey. He has edited The Norton Anthology of Latino Literature, the three-volume set Isaac Bashevis Singer: Collected StoriesThe Poetry of Pablo Neruda, among dozens of other volumes. He is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, Chile’s Presidential Medal, the International Latino Book Award, and the Jewish Book Award. Stavans’s work, translated into twenty languages, has been adapted to the stage and screen. A cofounder of the Great Books Summer Program at Amherst, Stanford, Chicago, Oxford, and Dublin, he is the host of the NPR podcast "In Contrast."

Brookline Booksmith, located just outside of Boston in Coolidge Corner, originally opened in 1961 as Paperback Booksmith with the slogan “Dedicated to the fine art of browsing.” The store was one of the first bookstores on the East Coast to recognize that “serious” paperback books—a publishing phenomenon of the late 1950s—opened up the world of great literature to a mass audience. Prior to that, paperbacks mostly featured westerns and nurse stories and “serious” literature was only available in hardcover. Paperback Booksmith sold a diverse range of books—from great literature to naughty books, from books by and about the radical left to books by and about the radical right. The Booksmith was one of the first stores to display the books by category, rather than by publisher, and to organize its books alphabetically by author, encouraging customers to enjoy browsing on their own and at their leisure. Since its beginnings as Paperback Booksmith, Brookline Booksmith has continued to evolve, serving the people of Brookline and Boston.

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Apr
29
6:00 PM18:00

Arshia Sattar at The Book House

On Sunday, April 29, renowned scholar and author Arshia Sattar will appear at The Book House to discuss her illustrated retelling of the Ramayana. An unforgettable tale of love, adventure, flying monkeys and god acting in the world of humans, Ramayana has been treasured by readers around the world for thousands of years. Now in an authoritative, gripping retelling, readers have a new chance to explore this classic’s riches.

Arshia Sattar has a PhD in classical Indian literatures from the University of Chicago. Her translations from Sanskrit, The Ramayana of Valmiki and Tales from the Kathasaritsagara, have been published as Penguin Classics. She has also written books for children, including The Adventures of Hanuman.

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Apr
23
7:00 PM19:00

Iranian Novelist Shahriar Mandanipour Discusses His Novel Moon Brow at AAWW

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Visions and Fever Dreams: New Iranian Lit

Come for a special reading on folklore, the Iranian revolution, and people whose dreams were lost to history. “One of Iran's greatest novelists” (The Guardian), Shahriar Mandanipour reads from Moon Brow, the story of a playboy-turned-soldier shell shocked from the Iran-Iraq War who sees visions of angels from the past. Jasmin Darznik reads from Song of a Captive Bird, her debut novel about the life of legendary rebel feminist poet Forough Farrokhzad; the novel translates many of her poems into English for the first time. Also featuring Mananipour’s translator Sara Khalili, and moderated by Porochista Khakpour.

Shahriar Mandanipour is one of Iran’s most accomplished writers, the author of nine volumes of fiction, one nonfiction book, and more than 100 critical essays. Born in 1957 in Shiraz, Iran, he studied political science at Tehran University and bore witness to the 1979 revolution. After the onset of the Iran-Iraq war in 1980, he joined the military and volunteered for duty at the front, where he served for more than eighteen months. His first collection of stories was published in 1989; his works were banned between 1992 and 1997. In 2006, he moved to the United States and has held fellowships at Brown, Harvard, and Boston College. Mandanipour’s first novel to appear in English, Censoring an Iranian Love Story (Knopf,  2009), has been widely acclaimed. He currently teaches creative writing at Tufts University.

Sara Khalili is an editor and translator of contemporary Iranian literature. Her translations include Censoring an Iranian Love Story by Shahriar Mandanipour, The Pomegranate Lady and Her Sons by Goli Taraghi, The Book of Fate by Parinoush Saniee, and Rituals of Restlessness by Yaghoub Yadali. She has also translated several volumes of poetry by Forough Farrokhzad, Simin Behbahani, Siavash Kasraii, and Fereydoon Moshiri. Her short story translations have appeared in The Kenyon Review, The Virginia Quarterly Review, EPOCH, GRANTA, Words Without Borders, The Literary Review, PEN America, Witness, and Consequence.

Jasmin Darznik is the author of the New York Times bestseller The Good Daughter: A Memoir of My Mother’s Hidden Life. Her novel Song of a Captive Bird is a fictional account of Iran’s trailblazing woman poet, Forugh Farrokhzad, and will be published by Random House in February 2018. Jasmin was born in Tehran, Iran and came to America when she was five years old. She holds an MFA in fiction from Bennington College and a Ph.D. in English from Princeton University. Now a professor of English and creative writing at California College of the Arts, she lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her family.

Porochista Khakpour’s debut novel Sons and Other Flammable Objects was a New York Times Editor’s Choice, one of the Chicago Tribune’s Fall’s Best, and the 2007 California Book Award winner in the “First Fiction” category. Her second novel The Last Illusion was a 2014 "Best Book of the Year" according to NPR, Kirkus, Buzzfeed, Popmatters, Electric Literature, and many more.  Among her many fellowships is a National Endowment for the Arts award. Her nonfiction has appeared in many sections of The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Elle, SlateSalon, and Bookforum, among many others. Currently, she is guest faculty at VCFA and Stonecoast's MFA programs as well as Contributing Editor at The Evergreen Review. Born in Tehran and raised in the Los Angeles area, she lives in New York City’s Harlem.

Established in 1991, Asian American Writers Workshop is a national not-for-profit arts organization devoted to the creating, publishing, developing and disseminating of creative writing by Asian Americans–in other words, we’re the preeminent organization dedicated to the belief that Asian American stories deserve to be told. We’re building the Asian literary culture of tomorrow through our curatorial platform, which includes our New York events series and our online editorial initiatives. In a time when China and India are on the rise, when immigration is a vital electoral issue, when the detention of Muslim Americans is a matter of common practice, we believe Asian American literature is vital to interpret our post-multicultural but not post-racial age. Our curatorial take is intellectual and alternative, pop cultural and highbrow, warm and artistically innovative, and vested in New York City communities.

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Ana Simo & Sarah Schulman at The Bureau of General Services—Queer Division
Mar
24
7:00 PM19:00

Ana Simo & Sarah Schulman at The Bureau of General Services—Queer Division

  • The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
heartland web banner.jpg

On Saturday, March 24, Ana Simo will appear at The Bureau of General Services—Queer Division to read from her provocative first novel, Heartland, along with author, activist, and co-founder of #theLesbianAvengers Sarah Schulman. 

A word-drunk romp through an alternate, pre-apocalyptic United States, Ana Simo's fiction debut is the uproarious story of a thwarted writer’s elaborate revenge on the woman who stole her lover. Blending elements of telenovela, pulp noir, and dystopian satire, Heartland is above all a hallucinatory indictment of racism, American style.

A New Yorker most of her life, Ana Simo came of age in a Cuba where a revolution’s sense of endless freedom was almost immediately replaced by iron-fisted censorship and rabidly homophobic witch-hunts that jailed or institutionalized LGBT people, forcing her and others to flee.

In France, she studied with Roland Barthes, participated in early women’s and gay/lesbian rights groups, also continued a life-long dialogue with European (& American) writers. Her literary family includes the profane, anti-clerical satirist Rabelais (Gargantua and Pantagruel), Robert Walser (Jakob von Gunten), Kathy Acker (Don Quixote) and Marie NDiaye (The Woman Changed Into A Log).

Immigrating finally to New York in the 1970s, Simo put down roots in the artistically and politically transgressive East Village where she co-founded the city’s first openly lesbian theater, Medusa’s Revenge, and felt free to attack her persistent preoccupations of immigration and assimilation, history, guilt, race, sex, and the impossibility of language, themes that appear in Heartland and throughout her work from the early play Pickaxe about Trotsky’s murder to The Opium Wars, a collaboration with composer Zeena Parkins.

Simo is also the co-founder of the direct action group the Lesbian Avengers, the national cable program Dyke TV, and The Gully online magazine, offering queer views on everything.

Sarah Schulman's work spans novels, plays, journalism, and nonfiction. She is a Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at the College of Staten Island. Some of her recent works include the movie United in Anger: A History of ACT UP, and the nonfiction work Conflict is not Abuse: Overstating Harm, Community Responsibility and the Duty of Repair. Her 19th book, MAGGIE TERRY, a novel of murder and intrigues, will be published in September 2018 by The Feminist Press.

The Bureau of General Services--Queer Division is an independent, all-volunteer queer cultural center, bookstore, and event space hosted by The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center in New York City. in New York City.

Where: Bureau of General Services—Queer Division, 208 W 13th St #210, New York, NY 10011.
When: Saturday, March 24, 2018 at 7PM.

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Grace Talusan at the Boston Book Festival
Oct
28
6:00 PM18:00

Grace Talusan at the Boston Book Festival

Join Grace Talusan, winner of the 2017 Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing, at the Boston Book Festival. Grace will be appearing alongside author Ha Jin for an event entitled Where Do I Belong - the Experience of Immigration. Hosted by the Christian Science Monitor, this panel is devoted to exploring the immigrant experience through the eyes of a writer.    
 

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Breaking Borders: A Latin American Benefit Celebration
Sep
14
to Sep 15

Breaking Borders: A Latin American Benefit Celebration

We’re living in a time when open borders have come under threat. Thankfully, great literature stands in opposition to dividing lines by building connections across cultures, languages, and identities. Join London literary magazine Litro, Brooklyn non-profit publisher Restless Books, and a continent-spanning array of writers, artists, actors, dancers and musicians as we celebrate the defiance of borders and the launch of Litro’s World Series—Latin America edition, with an unforgettable evening of Latin American food, drinks from Estrella Jalisco and Brooklyn Gin, music, and culture at the East Village Mexican restaurant La Palapa. Plus, there will be an unforgettable after-party with a DJ and dancing sponsored by Herradura tequila!

¡Únanse a esta Latinada!

Where: La Palapa, 77 St Marks Place, New York, NY 10003

When: 7:30 pm - 1:00 am, Thursday, September 14th, 2017

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Restless Books at the Small Press Flea at Grand Army Plaza
Jul
29
10:00 AM10:00

Restless Books at the Small Press Flea at Grand Army Plaza

On Saturday July 29, Restless Books will be selling books and saying hello outside the Brooklyn Public Library's Grand Army Plaza branch for the third-annual Small Press Flea. Presented by BOMB Magazine. We'll have all of our titles available for purchase at discount prices and maybe even some freebies. Watch this space for more information!

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Deepak Unnikrishnan and Ilan Stavans at the American Writers Museum
Jul
22
2:00 PM14:00

Deepak Unnikrishnan and Ilan Stavans at the American Writers Museum

At a time when immigrants are perceived as a threat to society, particularly from the Arab world, a space for them to deliver their own story is desperately needed. Join Deepak Unnikrishnan, author of the critically acclaimed novel Temporary People, about guest workers in the United Arab Emirate’s capital Abu Dhabi, in conversation with Ilan Stavans, internationally renowned cultural critic and publisher of Restless Books, as well as Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College. Temporary People (Restless Books) is the winner of Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing. The dialogue, followed by a Q&A, will explore the role that the literature of immigration in the United States plays in our conception of pluralism and tolerance.

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